Tip: Cold-Weather Blood Cholesterol Levels

Blood contains less water in winter, slightly concentrating cholesterol, which means your total cholesterol reading could be higher in winter than in summer.

Did you know that blood contains less water in winter, slightly concentrating cholesterol?  This means your total cholesterol reading could be higher in winter than in summer.

Check your Blood Cholesterol LevelIn 2004, a study at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center found that blood cholesterol levels naturally fluctuate throughout the year, rising in the winter and falling in the summer. The most notable changes occurred in those with elevated cholesterol and in women, with levels fluctuating by as much as 18 points and resulting in 22% going over the “official” high-cholesterol mark of 240 mg/dl during winter.

Call to Action:

  1. Get several cholesterol checks.

  2. Make sure at least one reading is in the spring or fall, when levels are at a midpoint.

The researchers estimate, cold-weather readings could result in a misdiagnosis of high cholesterol for as many as 3,000,000 Americans.

To your wellness,

Lynn

(Source of this Tip: Super Foods Health Style, page 12.)

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